Patreon

When Carl and I started our newsletter, we knew that we’d only be able to send one out three or four times a year once we were actually in Cambridge. We also knew there were a lot of friends and family who were hoping for more frequent and detailed updates. At the same time, I was racking my brains to come up with a more sustainable way to earn money through my writing than the occasional published short story and the small percentage of people who buy my books. That led to the creation of my Patreon page, a place where people can pledge $1/month for access to weekly journal posts while we’re in Cambridge. Higher pledges unlock further writing–stories and such–but I wanted to keep the basics accessible for everyone. (I really want to say “$1 is less than your weekly cup of coffee!” but that marketing slogan has become SO overdone I don’t quite dare.)

Patreon is a fairly recent site, created as a way for people of all walks to life to be able to support art and artistry according to their interest and ability. It builds upon the old model of patron-and-artist, where rather than commissioning a particular piece of work or simply buying a finished product, patrons make a way for the artist to work freely and serve his or her art. I have set up my site the way I have to give me both accountability–I am committed to writing the weekly blog posts as well as the fiction pieces at each level–and artistic freedom: there are no limits as to the subject or nature of my writing. I think this is going to be a marvelous way to develop my writing skills as well as practice self-discipline, and I am thrilled over the chance to form a closer relationship with my patrons.

If this is a way you’d like to support my writing, or a way you’d like to contribute financial support for our family for the three years we’re at Cambridge, click on this link.  The first couple of posts on there are free for all to read. If you have any questions about this, leave a comment here or send me a private note, and I’d love to chat with you about it.We are less than one week out from our move! My very next blog post on Patreon will be written from Cambridge. Hard to believe, and also so exciting!
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Writing as Community

As I might have mentioned on here a time or two (or twelve), our family is moving to England this fall. My husband Carl has been accepted into Cambridge’s PhD program, so we are “up roots and away” for three years.

Obviously, the main reason and focus is Carl’s continuing education. But we are a team, always have been, and nothing in our lives is ever all about one or the other of us. My goal while at Cambridge is to enrich and expand my writing, to get at the heart of what sort of stories I tell and why, and to make connections with other artists (literary and otherwise).

Here’s the amazing thing about creating: it doesn’t happen in a bubble. The idea of the solitary genius scribbling away in a lonely garret isn’t really very plausible. Even outside an artistic community to help and encourage, life has to happen for the writing to be any good.

To that end, I have started a Patreon page in order to build a community around my writing, to help me get out there and live fully while we’re in England, and then to share that life with others. The most basic tier–$1/month–will access weekly journal posts. This is something I’ve wanted to do ever since we moved to New England and Carl began seminary, but without an outside readership keeping me accountable, I let other things creep in and get in the way. This way, I am committing to my readers just as they are committing to me.

The higher tiers get you access to other types of writing: flash fiction, short stories, that sort of thing.

Writing is a tricky business, and indie publishing even more so. There are beautiful perks–I often say I don’t have fans, I have friends, because my fanbase is so small each member has become a dear friend. I love that. There are also downsides–without a marketing team behind me, it’s difficult to spread word about my books and pick up new readers, thus things like “paying the bills” can become a treacherous quagmire. That is the nature of the business, and I am not complaining.

This Patreon is a way, I hope, of shrinking some of the difficulties and maximizing the best parts of a writing career. I have a built-in audience, which brings about even more joy in the writing and builds a natural community. I also have to worry less about whether or not the writing will bring enough of a return for me to justify keeping on with it.

If this is something that resonates with you, or even if you just want to keep up with our Cambridge adventure on a more regular basis than will be available through this dear old haphazard blog of mine, go on over to my Patreon account and sign up today! It’s going to be a wonderful journey.

I guarantee there will be lots of tea and scones, and much exploring of hidden paths.

Cambridge

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We went to Cambridge! And made it back again, though if it weren’t for the fact that our girls were still stateside we might not have ever left.

England was everything I’d ever dreamed it would be. I couldn’t believe how much it was like how I’d always imagined it, in fact. I kept bracing myself for it to be different, to not live up to my imaginings, but no. It was exactly as I’d dreamed.

Now, I’m guessing that if I had gone to Yorkshire I wouldn’t have found a secret garden and children playing with wild animals on the moor. Lord Peter and Harriet Vane would not be punting in Oxford. Miss Read would not be bicycling to school in the Cotswolds. I didn’t see any hobbits, nor did any cupboard doors lead me to Narnia. I did pass Platform 9 3/4 at Kings’ Cross, but it was not in between platforms 9 and 10, and was clearly a tourist trap.

I do know the difference between fiction and reality. I just like to ignore it whenever possible.

The essence of England, though, the very Englishness of it … that was there. That was real. And I loved it.

We were only in London long enough to get from plane to train to tube to train (and then the reverse coming back), and the rest of the time we spent in Cambridge. Oh, for more time, to get to Oxford, and see the sights in London, to travel the rest of the island! We made the most of our four and a half days, though. We tramped 40 miles all over Cambridge and got to know that city far better than most tourists can.

It is beautiful.

I could write pages and pages of our adventures there, but as I doubt they’d be as fascinating to others as they were to us (met with university housing! Had a cream tea! Were served tea and toast every morning by our hosts! Explored possible places to live! Walked through an ancient cemetery and saw my first European robin! Were nearly mobbed by swans looking for food! Went to Waterstones and the Cambridge University Press bookshop and couldn’t buy anything either place because I had no room in my bag!), I’ll hold back.

We can’t wait to go back. I can’t believe we’ll actually be living there for three (or maybe more, depending on how long Carl’s PhD takes) years.

It’s going to be a most fantastic adventure.

With lots of tea. And scones.

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